Kansas Angler
Online Edition
 
Google
 
Web www.zeiners.com
www.kansasangler.com cottonwoodmercantile.com
  Store | Shopping

  
Angler Home

Please Support
Angler Sponsors

 Subscribe to
The Kansas Angler

State
Fishing Reports

Kansas
Region 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5

Arknsas Fishing Reports
Colorado Fishing Reports
Iowa Fishing Report
Missouri Fishing Reports
Nebraska Fishing Reports

Oklahoma Fishing Reports
Texas Fishing Reports
Moon Phases

Angler Reports
Kansas ~ Arkansas,
Colorado ~ Iowa,
Missouri ~ Nebraska,
Oklahoma ~ Texas 

Anglers' Academy
Fishing and Tackle Tips

Tackle Manufacturer Tips
Lure Making Tips

Fishing Guides
Kansas, Arkansas
Missouri, Oklahoma
Texas

Kansas Club Corner
Kansas Fishing Clubs
Tournament Schedule
Tournament Results

 Tournament Trail
Contacts | Schedules
Kansans on the Trail

Photo Gallery
Fish Photographs

Kids Cove
Kids Home
News, Information,
Games, Photo Gallery,
Fishing Stories, Fishing Tips

Reader's Nook
The Latest Angler News
Current Articles
Kansas Angler Archives

Angler Links
Manufacturers
State Agencies
Other Links of Interest

Kansas State Info
State Record Fish
License Information 

Ks Hunting Reports
Region 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5
From Kansas Hunters

Kansas Angler Info
About The Angler
Advertising Info
Contact The Angler 

Copyright 1999-2005
No reproduction of any kind.

 

Hugo Lake number one for Oklahoma bass in 2004 - two years running

Konawa best big Oklahoma lake for bass numbers

February 2003 - For bass fishing prospects on lakes larger than 1,000 acres, Lake Konawa in south-central Oklahoma appears to be a promising destination, according to spring electrofishing data released by the Oklahoma Department
of Wildlife Conservation.

Covering 1,300 acres near Konawa, Lake Konawa produced 188 bass per hour of electrofishing during this year's surveys. That's a slight drop from last year, when it produced 207 bass per hour.

Ranking second was Dripping Springs Lake, which produced more than 172 bass per hour during this year's electrofishing bass surveys. The Department did not sample it last year. Grand Lake in northeast Oklahoma ranked third with 145 bass per hour. That's a considerable jump from 1999, when it produced107 bass per hour.

Ranking fourth was Lake Broken Bow (107 bass per hour), followed by McGee Creek Lake (103 bass per hour), Lake Hudson (90 bass per hour), Lake Skiatook (83 bass per hour) and Lake Texoma (82 bass per hour).

If you're interested in big bass, Lake Konawa topped that category, too. For each hour of electrofishing, it produced about 84 bass per hour longer than 14 inches. That's a slight jump from last year, when 81 bass per hour were longer than 14 inches.

Grand Lake ranked second in that category with about 56 bass per hour that were longer than 14 inches. Ranking third was Lake Hudson (47 bass per hour over 14 inches), followed by McGee Creek (34 bass per hour over 14 inches), Lake Texoma (29 bass per hour over 14 inches) and Lake Fuqua (28 bass per hour over 14 inches).

"Lake Konawa has a good forage base, good production and good recruitment, all of which indicate a healthy bass fishery," said Kim Erickson, chief of fisheries for the Department. "From what we've seen over the last few years, it's been a very consistent producer during spring sampling."

This year, no lake larger than 1,000 acres produced a bass that exceeded 10 pounds. Lake Ellsworth produced the largest bass during spring electrofishing, and it weighed 8.8 pounds. Two other lakes produced bass larger than eight pounds, including Dripping Springs (8.7 pounds) and Webbers Falls (8.1 pounds).

Data from the springtime bass survey is divided between that collected from lakes larger than 1,000 acres, and lakes smaller than 1,000 acres. The data is used to determine the health and trends of individual bass fisheries. Regional fisheries management personnel capture bass using electrofishing equipment, and then they weigh and measure each fish before releasing them back into the water unharmed. The information helps biologists determine which lakes might benefit from specialized management techniques such as length and slot limits.

The Department rates a lake as high quality when it produces more than 15 bass over 14 inches per hour of electrofishing. Quality lakes yield more than 10 bass over 14 inches per hour of electrofishing, and those which produce fewer than 10 per hour are considered below average.

In terms of total numbers of bass per hour, lakes that yield more than 60 bass of any size per hour are rated as high quality. Those producing 40 bass or more per hour are considered "quality" lakes, and less than 40 per hour are considered below average.

Adair tops bass list for small Oklahoma lakes
Among lakes smaller than 1,000 acres, Adair Recreation Lake in Adair
County produced the most bass per hour during spring electrofishing surveys
conducted by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.

In terms of overall numbers, Adair Lake produced 198 bass per hour
of electrofishing, a big jump from last year when it yielded 124 bass per
hour. Ranking second was Mountain Lake in Garvin Co., with nearly 183 bass
per hour, followed by Lake Raymond Gary in Choctaw Co. (128 bass per hour)
, Taylor Lake in Grady Co. (124 bass per hour) and American Horse Lake in
Blaine Co. (122 bass per hour).

Rounding out the top 10 small lakes were Chimney Rock Lake in Mayes
Co. (120 bass per hour), Okemah Lake in Okfuskee Co. (101 bass per hour),
Onapa Lake in McIntosh Co. (96 bass per hour), Boomer Lake in Osage Co. (90
bass per hour), and Sportsman Lake in Seminole County (90 bass per hour).

For numbers of bass larger than 14 inches per hour of
electrofishing, Mountain Lake was the top producer with 137. Durant Lake was
a distant second with more than 67 bass per hour over 14 inches, followed by
Okemah Lake (61 bass per hour over 14 inches) Lake Raymond Gary in Choctaw
Co. (36 bass per hour over 14 inches), and Lake Fairfax in Osage Co. (nearly
35 bass per hour over 14 inches)

No lake smaller than 1,000 acres produced a largemouth weighing 10
pounds or more, but three - Sportsman Lake, Lake Raymond Gary and Lake
Holdenville - each produced a bass weighing more than eight pounds.
Sportsman Lake produced one that weighed 8.9 pounds, Raymond Gary yielded
one that weighed 8.8 pounds, and Lake Holdenville produced one that weighed
8.5 pounds.

Lake Watonga in Blaine Co., yielded a 7.5-pound bass, and Lake Vincent in
Ellis Co., produced a 7.2-pounder.

Since only a few of Oklahoma's small lakes were surveyed, Kim
Erickson, chief of fisheries for the Department, said that anglers shouldn't
use the data as a comprehensive guide to quality fishing in Oklahoma. Many
other lakes that weren't surveyed this year also have outstanding bass
populations.

"Although the results of the survey can help anglers find good
places to fish, they're not the only information anglers should use when
making their decisions on where to go," Erickson said. "There are hundreds
of small lakes across the state, and we can't survey all of them every year.
Based on the numbers, these are the best lakes we surveyed this year, but
they're not necessarily the best in the state."

Electrofishing surveys are conducted by regional fisheries
management personnel to measure the health and trends of individual bass
fisheries. Bass captured during the surveys are weighed, measured and
released back into the water unharmed. The information collected helps
biologists determine which lakes might benefit from specialized management
techniques, such as length or slot limits.

In evaluating electrofishng data, the Department rates a lake as
high quality when it produces more than 15 bass over 14 inches per hour of
electrofishing. Quality lakes yield more than 10 bass over 14 inches per
hour, while those producing fewer than 10 are considered below average.

For total numbers of bass per hour, lakes that yield more than 60
bass of any size per hour are rated as high quality. Those producing 40 or
more bass per hour are considered "quality" lakes, and less than 40 per hour
is considered below average.


When a record isn't a record
Texas angler lands Oklahoma record trout,
but record gets away after all is said and done

Every angler has a tale about, The one that got away, but a recent story from southeast Oklahoma beats them all.

On March 13, while fly fishing below the re-regulation dam on the lower Mountain Fork River, Barry Kniffen of Tyler, Texas, hooked a monster brown trout on an olive wooly bugger. An avid bass tournament angler, Kniffen was relatively new to fly fishing, so it was especially remarkable that he could land such a large fish on such light tackle in high water and strong current. Furthermore, the trout measured 25 inches long and weighed eight pounds, enough to break the Oklahoma state-record for that species.

Two other anglers witnessed the catch, and Kniffen sent several
good-quality photographs to the Department's assistant chief of fisheries, Barry Bolton. Unfortunately, Kniffen neglected to have the catch certified by an Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation fisheries biologist, disqualifying it from consideration as a potential record.

The ODWC was prepared to send personnel to Kniffen1s home to witness a second weighing, but Kniffen1s taxidermist had already begun mounting the fish before Bolton could contact him. Kniffen landed the fish, but his state record got away.

Mr. Kniffen hooked and landed a very impressive fish on light tackle, and the Wildlife Department congratulates him on his accomplishment,2 Bolton said.

However, we regret that his potential state record cannot receive the recognition it deserves. That1s why it is so important for an angler who catches a potential record to follow the required procedure.

Anglers who believe they have caught a record fish should immediately contact a Department employee to certify the weight and measurement. A Department fisheries employee must then verify the species. For more information, consult the 2000 Oklahoma Fishing Regulations or call the Department1s Fisheries Division at (405) 521-3721.

Oklahoma Fishing Report | Home Page

Reader's Nook Home | Current Articles | Angler Archives

 

ProFish-n-Sea Charters World Class Website Award

 
Website

Shopping Cart

 
Copyright 1999-2005 by The Kansas Angler - PO Box 357 - Cottonwood Falls, KS 66845 - Phone 620-273-8100
Questions or problems with this website should be directed to webmaster.
   Kuuloa Kai's Top Site Award

~~~~

~