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Video and instructions to help prevent the spread of Zebra Mussels

Updated March 22, 2017


Traditional collection, sampling and study of crappie through trap-netting may be helped by a newer method.
New netting method helps crappie management 

Managing a fishery isn’t just stocking, creating habitat, fertilizing and adjusting harvest regulations. Biologists must have a true picture of what a population of a certain fish species in the lake looks like before they make changes, and they have to keep tabs on that population to determine if the management changes have the desired effect. Monitoring crappie populations can be a challenge. 

A new method of netting may help biologists take a snapshot of the population when conditions are less than ideal. Traditionally, biologists would set up trap nets to catch crappie as they moved toward shallow water for spawning or following shad in fall. Essentially, a large hoop net was placed in the water, and a long, fence-like runner was attached to cover a section of water and guide crappie to the net.

But trap-netting has its shortcomings because it is most effective in shallow water, while crappie often tend to be in deeper water where the trap nets can’t reach. Always in search of a better mouse (or crappie) trap, biologists throughout the U.S. have dabbled with different ways to sample crappie populations and replace the trap net in challenging areas.Thanks to communication with Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, AGFC fisheries biologists may have found the solution to trap-netting troubles.

Andy Yung, regional fisheries biologist at the AGFC’s Camden regional office, says Louisiana and Arkansas have a partnership meeting every other year to share information and learn from each other. During a recent meeting, Louisiana biologists gave a presentation on a new type of netting technique called a lead net, which can overcome the barriers of trap nets.

“In a lot of our lakes, we know that crappie are holding along creek channel swings and deep flats, but we can’t get to them through conventional means,” Yung said. “But these lead nets let us go to the crappie instead of waiting for a relatively brief window when they come up shallow.”Yung says AGFC biologists have been experimenting with the new net style for a few years and comparing them alongside results of trap nets. In some cases, the trap nets would indicate very few fish in areas where biologists knew healthy crappie populations existed. Lead

Yung says AGFC biologists have been experimenting with the new net style for a few years and comparing them alongside results of trap nets. In some cases, the trap nets would indicate very few fish in areas where biologists knew healthy crappie populations existed. Lead nets placed in deeper water in the same lakes yielded much better results.

“In some cases, lead nets were more than 40 times more successful,” Yung said. “That lets us spend less time running nets for crappie sampling and frees up more time to devote to habitat improvement and other fisheries efforts.”

Biologists in seven districts worked with the nets last fall and winter, collecting results on a monthly basis to determine the best times for sampling. Armed with this new information, Yung hopes to streamline the sampling process even further and use the new technique to make better decisions for crappie regulations and recommendations. “Once we have fine-tuned the netting procedure, we’ll be able to have a standard sampling method across all our districts and really be able to compare the crappie fisheries around the state and develop trend data all of us can use,” Yung said.